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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an exhi business here at the morgan called winston churchill, the power of words. >> what you're loo
of the organization of the rebels after the recent recognition on the one hand by france and britain, i think, and secondly the conferences that they have had to create some kind of umbrella group? >> well, you've described the political track that's evolving and has been have been endorsed by a number of countries, that could come as soon as next week. but you still have a very fractured military command on the ground. that's one reason this new political entity was created to help streamline some of the decisions that are made on the ground. and so the united states and other allies working with the opposition fighters can have a more coordinated approach to dealing with the fighters on the ground. the opposition now is quite diverse on the ground, the u.s. is trying to consolidate that with the help of allies. >> rose: what's their assessment of assad at the moment? the intelligence sources both in the united states and overseas? >> it's very hard to know, charlie. i mean, one of the things that -- there was hope early on that he might take a deal and move out of the country. that's lookin
britain germany and france has moved from the country side to the cities two, hundred million people. and they don't have the same status as those who live there of initially, officially, you have an urban middle class 300 million people and growing .. this is a society that has got a lot of pushes and pulls going on, and my worry is that if they find it difficult to manage that, they resort to nationalism, you have seen a little bit of that toward japan, and the problem is, that that wells up from the people. that is not the government and the government has tried to use some of these demonstrations to sort of make a point about japan, and they nearly lost control on a couple of occasions, so i -- i think that -- i don't think of china as an enemy, it is a competitor. it is a partner in many ways. but we also have to work with the chinese in terms of how do we -- how do we persuade them to become a responsible steak holder? .. and sort of abide by the rules? china's rise is not necessarily disadvantages you to the united states. >> rose: it is not a zero sum a game? >> no, i don't
was discouraging because i really wanted to be him and write about boxing and food and france and new york lowlife but i don't know anything about any of those things. >> rose:. >> it was his abilities as a stylist that attracted you or a storyteller? >> he was a great stylist, really, i mean, he was his own story. and it was really all about him, i think, but he was a beautiful stylist, and when i was at the magazine, they used to i had lunch once with william sean and he said it was true that aj liebling sat in his office at the new yorker and pounding the keys and he was chart chortling at his own work. >> the only person in the history of the magazine to enjoy writing. everybody else suffered through it. >> rose: a moment of great pleasure to writ write write for new yorker magazine? >> it was a lot of fun. i liked writing faulk of the town when it was anonymous, and. >> rose: yeah. >> and it was just that anonymous, curious reporter, wandering around the city and seeing whatever you saw. but it was like a little weekly newspaper to me and i enjoyed it a lot,. >> rose: you can always do that,
, compared to a place like france, where government spending is more than half of gdp. but it is going to keep creeping up and i think we need to be creative and alert to that. >> rose: i want to talk about what is going on in washington now between the president and the speaker, but if we -- if they fail completely and we go over this fiscal cliff what are the repercussions? you know, i mean, there is really a fair chance that they don't come to an agreement for whatever reason the house republicans won't support it and we go into 2013. i don't think that, per say, would be the end of the world because i think there would be a cry and it would get rein reined in after a few weeks and settle on this .. i would view this as a skirmish in a bigger war where you are growing entitlements, government services are getting more expensive. people are going to pay more and get less, and i think it is a very, very difficult tension of how to deal with that and this is just a first stage of that or one of many stages. so i don't think they are going to settle everything. i do hope they come to an
-- . >> rose: they saw america through movies. >> right. >> rose: an when the gis were going through france, they looked like gary cooper and jimmy stewart and henry fonda. and so it has a tremendous influence around the world. >> rose: what have you not done that you might have wanted to do? >> gosh, i've, you know, i think i've done-- i continue and love doing what i do. as you know, i had a chance to write a play awhile back about thurgood marshall and i had that on broadway. and when what i find is i live, i think what you can call a creative life. if i don't come up with an idea, nothing's going to happen. >> rose: but you also have management responsibility also. >> right. but that certainly in the world of film, you know, it's always been the challenge of great filmmakers that they not only have to have that artistic vision. but they have to be generals who can command troops. >> rose: i means that's exactly what directors are, they most often have been identified as more like generals than anything else because of all the things that su have to do. >> right. >> rose: . >> and there
, you did a little preshoot. and where you went up into the mountains in france and did 24 takes of singing at the top of his register in freezing conditions and wooden clogs. and the crew came back and they just said oh my god it's one of the most powerful things i have ever seen. at that point i relaxed and said i know there is something to this. we are going to be fine. >> i have been thinking about that question that you asked, anne because all the actors went through it and i'm a sports followers, so it is that thing of, it's not like you can, can i do it, can-- all of that. at some point you have to come to peace with that. but it's can you be at your best at the super bowl, or as a hundred meter runner will you run your best race at the olympics or maybe was that grand prix event six months before you will find out was a much better time. so it is the pressure you put on yourself because these opportunities come along once in a lifetime. people like this don't exist very often. and they rarely get the opportunity to make movie muse calls. so you just, and because we were l
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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